In the past 30 years, the hospitality industry has evolved into one of the quickest growing economic areas worldwide. Thus, hospitality and services are crucial for socio-economic development. 

Unfortunately, the continued growth ceased in 2020 amid the pandemic. With many hotels closed and travel restrictions enforced, the travel, hospitality, and tourism sectors have suffered since the beginning of COVID-19. The ongoing pandemic has reduced tourist arrivals to a fraction of what they were two years ago. 

Hospitality administrators, investors, and operators are doing their best to reduce their bottom-line while working hard to remain competitive and in touch with their stakeholders. 

Despite the hardship, the tourism and hospitality sectors have proved that by working together and implementing innovative staffing solutions (through technological advances like AGEMA Work’s platform), they can still help society.

Is Recovery Nearby?

Even though the future is unknown, there are some possible scenarios for the hospitality sector in 2021. According to Rod Clogh, President, HVS Americas, you can expect a rise in occupancy, specifically in the last half of the year. As a result, it is forecast that hospitality and services will almost recover occupancy by 2023. 

Twenty-twenty-one is a transition year as people need to feel safe and comfortable to allow themselves to travel. It is essential to note that recovery relies on vaccine distribution and both employer and customer protection.

How Do Hospitality Workers Need To Transform During COVID-19?

COVID-19 came to change the way we work, live, and interact with others. As a result, hospitality workers are now required to transform how they work during the pandemic.

First, people working in hotels and other accommodation businesses need to protect themselves and guests from COVID-19. Everyone is responsible for following necessary precautions:

  • Wash hands frequently for at least 20 seconds.
  • Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer after exchanging money, credit cards, or items with guests. 
  • Every time you cough or sneeze, cover with the elbow or a tissue.
  • Stay at least six feet apart from other staff members and guests.
  • Avoid contact with other staff members and guests. This means no hugging, shaking hands, or kissing.
  • All employees should wear 3-ply masks.
  • Workers older than 60 years or with health issues such as diabetes, lung cancer, or heart disease should use a medical mask. 
  • It is recommended to remain behind plexiglass boards at reception and concierge desks. This can block droplet transmission. 
  • Whenever possible, employees should telework to reduce physical contact with others. 
  • Always follow local guidelines, recommendations and mandates.

Lastly, if a guest develops COVID-19 symptoms like dry cough, fever, or tiredness, hospitality staff must immediately contact the local health force and follow their guidelines.